Mac troubleshooting: dealing with hard drive woes

Your Mac has begun showing signs of trouble. Perhaps you frequently get errors when trying to open or save files. You suspect a problem with the hard drive. Before panic sets in, you want to launch Apple’s Disk Utility and select Repair Disk from the First Aid tab. Hopefully, that will remedy the situation. One problem though: Repair Disk is dimmed and you can’t select it. Why? Because OS X cannot attempt repairs on an active startup drive. You can still use Repair Permissions, which may help in certain situations. But let’s assume it doesn’t.

So what do you do instead? That depends on what Macs you own, how you have set them up, and what other precautions you may have taken prior to the start of the trouble.

First things first, if you don’t have a recent backup, make one now. But be careful. At this point, you don’t want to overwrite an existing backup—lest you replace valid data with corrupted data. Instead, back up to a separate drive. When you’re done backing up, here are the things to try. You can try each method until you find one that works:

Boot from the startup drive’s Recovery HD partition

The startup drives of Macs formatted with OS X 10.7 (Lion) or 10.8 (Mountain Lion) typically have a hidden partition designed just for moments like this. This 650MB partition is called Recovery HD. Boot your Mac from Recovery HD by holding down Command-R at startup (or by choosing it from within Startup Manager, which you access by holding down Option at startup).

If you are able to boot from Recovery HD, Disk Utility will be one of its four main options. Open Disk Utility and locate the name of your startup drive. You should now be able to select Repair Disk for that drive. From Recovery HD, you can also browse the Web for troubleshooting info using Safari as well as erase your startup drive and restore its contents from a Time Machine backup.

If you are unable to boot Recovery HD via either of these methods, it means there is no Recovery HD partition on your drive or your drive is too damaged to allow successful booting from the partition. In either case, it’s time to move on to the next repair attempts.

Boot from your emergency drive

If you previously created an emergency drive (see “Mac troubleshooting: Be prepared for hard-drive failure”), now is the time to use it. Restart while holding down the Option key. From the screen that appears, select the emergency drive. Once booted, things should work nearly identically to starting up from the Recovery HD partition. LaunchDisk Utility, choose your startup drive in the list, and select Repair Disk.

Run from a cloned startup drive

If you created a clone of your startup drive, you can boot from the clone and run Disk Utility from there. To do so, restart while holding down the Option key. From the screen that appears, select the cloned drive. When startup is complete, you’ll find Disk Utility in the /Applications/Utilities folder, just as it is on your original drive.

You may be wondering: “Does my clone drive include a Recovery HD partition? Could I start up from that partition instead?” Maybe. If you used Shirt Pocket’s $28 SuperDuper to make a clone, the clone will likely not have the Recovery HD partition. If you used Bombich Software’s $40 Carbon Copy Cloner, it should. However, if you are using a cloned drive, I wouldn’t bother with its Recovery HD partition in any case. Instead, boot from the drive directly, as I just described.

Try Safe Boot


Restart your Mac while holding down the Shift key to perform a Safe Boot.

To perform a Safe Boot, restart your Mac while holding down the Shift key.According to Apple, a Safe Boot “forces a directory check of the startup volume.” This is essentially the same thing as running First Aid’s Repair Disk. A downside of this method is that you get no feedback as to whether or not the repair succeeded. Still, if your problems vanish after doing a Safe Boot (and restarting again normally), you can assume that success was likely.

Access your Mac via Target Disk Mode

If you have two or more Macs, you may be able to connect one Mac to the other using Target Disk Mode. To do this, you’ll need a cable that can connect the two Macs. For Macs with FireWire ports, that means an appropriate FireWire cable. For Macs with Thunderbolt ports, you’ll want a Thunderbolt cable. If one Mac has FireWire and the other has Thunderbolt, you’ll need a Thunderbolt to FireWire adapter.

Once connected, boot from the second (properly working) Mac and put the problem Mac in Target mode (by holding down the T key at startup). The Target Mac should now appear as an external drive to the startup Mac. You can now attempt to repair it via Disk Utility.

Boot from Internet Recovery Mode

Internet Recovery mode uses a combination of code stored in your Mac’s firmware and a net-boot image stored on Apple’s servers to boot your Mac.

To enter Internet Recovery mode, hold down the Command-Option-R keys at startup. Run Disk Utilityfrom there.

I would use this method only if you can’t boot from the standard Recovery HD partition. This is because Internet Recovery mode requires that you download the needed software before it kicks into action. Depending on the speed of your Internet connection, this can take anywhere from about 5 minutes to more than 30 minutes. Also, note that Internet Recovery will not work with older Mac models.

Start up in Single User mode

You can do a disk repair attempt by starting up in Single User mode (holding down Command-S at startup) and running Unix’s fsck command. This method should almost never be necessary. However, if you find yourself with no other option, an Apple support article details exactly what to do.

You’ve run Repair Disk. Now what?


You’ve finally found at least one way to attempt a disk repair with Disk Utility’s First Aid or its equivalent. Congratulations. Now what? That depends on the outcome of your attempt:

Your disk is OK: If First Aid reports “the volume appears to be OK,” it’s time to look elsewhere for the cause of your problem. Ultimately, in a worst-case scenario, a fix could require reformatting your drive, reinstalling a fresh copy of OS X, and restoring your data from a backup. For details on how to do this, see “Should you do a ‘clean install’ of Lion?” The advice still applies for Mountain Lion.

Your disk has a problem but First Aid repairs it: If First Aid reports a problem and is able to repair it, that’s the likely end of the story. Conventional wisdom says to select Repair Disk a second time before quitting Disk Utility, just to be certain that no further repairs are needed. After that, reboot from the repaired drive and hope that all is fine now.

Your disk has a problem that First Aid cannot repair: If First Aid finds a problem but cannot repair it, you can try a third-party repair utility, such as Alsoft’s $100 DiskWarrior, which is even compatible with Apple’s new Fusion drive. Otherwise, reformatting the drive may help. It’s worth a try. (Even if this works, be aware that your drive is likely living on borrowed time. If you can’t copy your files off the drive, it may be time to look into recovery options.)

Software utilities and reformatting cannot fix a physical problem with the drive. If your drive is making unusual clicking noises, it’s almost certain you have a hardware problem. Assuming you’ve backed up your data, and given how inexpensive drives are these days, I would replace a drive before wasting too much time trying to resurrect it. If you can’t replace the drive yourself (which is likely with recent Mac models, almost all of which Apple has made difficult to pry open), it’s time for a trip to an Apple Store or Apple-authorized service provider.

 

MACBOOK PRO 13 KEYBOARD REPLACE

Today in shop i replaced a keyboard and back light for Mac book Pro 13. When changing keyboard it is always a good idea to replace back light also in case it tears while disassemble. Here are some steps to take so that you can replace your keyboard without worry. This process takes some time to complete, so be sure to have a clean and clear work area with good lighting.

To begin make sure laptop is turned off completely. Once off turn over with laptop closed to see bottom cover. Then remove all screws, paying attention to where each screw goes.

Image 1/1: Remove the following ten screws:

Once all screws removed remove back cover.

First thing first, remove connector for battery along with screws. REMOVE BATTERY

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Now that batter is removed we can start next with CD ROM Drive. 20151120_102330

With plastic Pry Tool lift Hard Drive Ribbon connector.20151120_102349

Next unscrew Hard Drive caddy then remove.20151120_102447 20151120_102454 20151120_102542

Slowly move ribbon so that its no longer on top of CD ROM Drive20151120_102600

Next with plastic tool remove CD ROM Ribbon, WiFi/Bluetooth Ribbon, Speaker connector and camera cable.

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Next remove antenna cable and remove 5 screws to remove airport assembly and speaker.

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Once removed you should see 3 screws holding CD ROM Drive in place. Remove them ans remove drive.

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Once removed you can remove speaker located under drive and remove assembly.20151120_104145 20151120_104204

Next we will remove 3 screws holding Fan and connector20151120_10461620151120_104630 20151120_104639 20151120_104737 20151120_104755

After removing fan we can then start on removing the rest of the connectors including display ribbon.

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Next with t6 screwdriver remove Logic Board screw. 20151120_105248

carefully remove mic after removing screws then slowly remove Board and set aside on static proof mat

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Once board removed brace holing keyboard down with 2 screws20151120_10572320151120_105815

Now to remove keyboard back light. I didn’t bother being gentle with it because i’m replacing this part. In most cases you will have to replace it because they tear or separate. After removing you will be able to see all screws holding keyboard in place. including 3 screw holding mic

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Remove keyboard then replace.

Reassemble in reverse order. GOOD LUCK!!!

IF YOUR HAVING ANY KEYBOARD RELATED ISSUES FEEL FREE TO GIVE ME A CALL OR STOP BY FOR YOUR FREE IN STORE ESTIMATE. I SERVICE ALL TYPES OF LAPTOPS AND DESKTOP WITH ALL TYPES OF ISSUES. I’M AVAILABLE ALL WEEK AND SATURDAYS.

CompGuyUSA

4620 W. Commercial BLVD. #7C

Tamarac, FL., 33319

compguyusa@gmail.com

Contact: (954) 228-7481

 

iMac G5 20″ Model A1145 Hard Drive Replacement

CompGuyUSA                                                                         4620 W. Commercial BLVD. #7C                                                                 Tamarac, FL., 33319                                                                         compguyusa@gmail.com                                                                             Contact: (954) 228-7481

Upgrade your hard drive for more storage space.

Image 1/1: Orient the iMac face-side down on a table with the bottom edge facing yourself.

Step 1 Access Door

  •  Orient the iMac face-side down on a table with the bottom edge facing yourself.
  •  Remove the two Phillips screws securing the access door to the bottom grille of your iMac.
  •  The screws are captive in the access door.

Image 1/1: Remove the access door.

Step 2

  •  Remove the access door.

Image 1/1: Remove the three T8 Torx screws securing the front bezel to the rear case along the lower edge of the iMac.

Step 3 Front Bezel

  •  Remove the three T8 Torx screws securing the front bezel to the rear case along the lower edge of the iMac.

Image 1/2: Turn the computer over.

Step 4

  •  Turn the computer over.
  •  Use your thumbs to press both RAM arms in past the front bezel for enough clearance to lift it off the rear case.

Image 1/1: While holding the RAM arms in with your thumbs, lift the lower edge of the front bezel enough to clear the rear case.

Step 5

  •  While holding the RAM arms in with your thumbs, lift the lower edge of the front bezel enough to clear the rear case.

Image 1/3: Re-orient your iMac so it sits upright on the stand.

Step 6

  •  Re-orient your iMac so it sits upright on the stand.
  •  Insert a plastic card up into the corner of the air vent slot near the top of the rear case.
  •  Push the card toward the top of the iMac to release the front bezel latch.
  •  Pull the front bezel away from the rear case.
  •  Repeat this process for the other side of the front bezel.
  •  It may be necessary to apply several layers of duct tape to the top of the access card to aid in releasing the latches.
  •  If the bezel refuses to release, try pressing the lower edge back onto the rear case and repeat this opening process.
  •  Alternatively, you can use a strong magnet by holding it to the front top left/right corner of the display. You will hear a snapping sound when the hatch is released.

Image 1/1: Lay your iMac stand-side down on a table.

Step 7

  •  Lay your iMac stand-side down on a table.
  •  Lift the front bezel from its lower edge and rotate it away from the rest of your iMac, minding the RAM arms that may get caught.
  •  Lay the front bezel above the rest of the iMac.

Image 1/1: If necessary, remove the piece of kapton tape wrapped around the microphone and camera connectors.

Step 8

  •  If necessary, remove the piece of kapton tape wrapped around the microphone and camera connectors.

Image 1/2: Disconnect both the camera and microphone cables.

Step 9

  •  Disconnect both the camera and microphone cables.

Image 1/1: Peel the lower EMI shield off the lower edge of the iMac and off the two vertical 4" sections on either side of the iMac.

Step 10 Lower EMI Shield

  •  Peel the lower EMI shield off the lower edge of the iMac and off the two vertical 4″ sections on either side of the iMac.
  •  It is not necessary to peel the lower EMI shield off the display.

Image 1/1: Tape the lower EMI shield up against the face of the display to keep it out of the way while you work.

Step 11

  •  Tape the lower EMI shield up against the face of the display to keep it out of the way while you work.

Image 1/1: Remove the two T6 Torx screws securing the display data cable connector to the logic board.

Step 12 Display

  •  Remove the two T6 Torx screws securing the display data cable connector to the logic board.

Image 1/1: To disconnect the display data cable, grab its connector's black tab and pull it away from the face of the logic board.

Step 13

  •  To disconnect the display data cable, grab its connector’s black tab and pull it away from the face of the logic board.

Image 1/1: Peel back the two EMI tape strips from the left and right edges of the display.

Step 14

  •  Peel back the two EMI tape strips from the left and right edges of the display.
  •  During reassembly, it is helpful to use several small strips of tape to hold the EMI shielding along the left and right edges of the display footprint out of the way before lowering the display into the rear case of your iMac.

Image 1/2: Remove the four recessed T10 Torx screws securing the display to the rear case.

Step 15

  •  Remove the four recessed T10 Torx screws securing the display to the rear case.
  •  Bit drivers tend to be too short to reach these screws. Be sure to have a magnetic thin-shafted T10 Torx screwdriver on hand.

Image 1/1: Lift the lower edge of the display slightly out of the rear case.

Step 16

  •  Lift the lower edge of the display slightly out of the rear case.
  •  Disconnect both inverter cables (shown in red) by pulling their connectors toward the bottom edge of your iMac.

Image 1/1: Lift the display until it is nearly perpendicular to the rear case.

Step 17

  •  Lift the display until it is nearly perpendicular to the rear case.
  •  Disconnect the remaining two inverter cables (shown in red) by pulling their connectors toward the top edge of your iMac.

Image 1/1: While holding the display perpendicular to the rear case, pull it upward to peel off the EMI shield stuck to its upper edge.

Step 18

  •  While holding the display perpendicular to the rear case, pull it upward to peel off the EMI shield stuck to its upper edge.

Image 1/1: Disconnect the hard drive thermal sensor from the logic board by pulling its connector toward the top edge of your iMac.

Step 19 Hard Drive

  •  Disconnect the hard drive thermal sensor from the logic board by pulling its connector toward the top edge of your iMac.

Image 1/1: Remove the two T10 Torx screws securing the hard drive bracket to the inverter.

Step 20

  •  Remove the two T10 Torx screws securing the hard drive bracket to the inverter.

Image 1/1: Lift the left edge of the hard drive slightly, then pull it toward the left edge of the iMac.

Step 21

  •  Lift the left edge of the hard drive slightly, then pull it toward the left edge of the iMac.
  •  When reinstalling your hard drive, make sure not to push the rubber grommets through the chassis with the hard drive mounting pins as retrieving them may require removing the logic board.

Image 1/1: Rotate the hard drive out of the rear case.

Step 22

  •  Rotate the hard drive out of the rear case.
  •  Disconnect the SATA data cable by pulling its connector away from the hard drive.

Image 1/1: Disconnect the SATA power cable by pulling its connector away from the hard drive.

Step 23

  •  Disconnect the SATA power cable by pulling its connector away from the hard drive.
  •  Remove the hard drive from the iMac.

Image 1/2: Remove the two T8 Torx screws securing the hard drive bracket to the connector side of the hard drive.

Step 24 Hard Drive

  •  Remove the two T8 Torx screws securing the hard drive bracket to the connector side of the hard drive.
  •  Remove the hard drive bracket.

Image 1/1: Remove the two T8 Torx pins from the side of the hard drive.

Step 25

  •  Remove the two T8 Torx pins from the side of the hard drive.
Image 1/1: Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the hard drive thermal sensor off the adhesive securing it to the hard drive.

Step 26

  •  Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the hard drive thermal sensor off the adhesive securing it to the hard drive.
  • Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

Article Source:

https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+G5+20-Inch+Model+A1145+Hard+Drive+Replacement/1147

CompGuyUSA                                                                         4620 W. Commercial BLVD. #7C                                                                 Tamarac, FL., 33319                                                                         compguyusa@gmail.com                                                                             Contact: (954) 228-7481